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Welcome to The Unofficial Website of Toronto's Outdoor Skating Rinks

 

There's nothing like outdoor skating

A project of CELOS

Latest News

posted March 23, 2015

All of Toronto's outdoor ice rinks are now closed until next season, starting again in November/December.

See our blog: Let's save some money - so that the city won't be out of money to open the rinks at the right time next season, when the sun is weak and we can have good ice at 12 degrees.

Find your outdoor rink


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List of Rinks and addresses.


Google Map of rinks and satellite map


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What makes rinks run well? See our animation.


 

Sir Adam Beck, March 19, 1 celsius, only one skater all day

March 21: Dufferin Rink still turned on, no skaters, but....

this is why City Hall's rink can stay open -- the hotel next door shades it from the afternoon sun

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City Skating programs

Information gathered from Toronto.ca

For drop-in hockey and shinny times, see this schedule (shows arenas as well as outdoor rinks): drop in hockey and shinny.

For pleasure skating, see this schedule (shows arenas as well as outdoor rinks): leisure skating.

Special Programs

For women's shinny see this scheduleWomen's Shinny

Lessons

Skating Lessons


Cityrinks Lists of Interest

Skate Rental.
Natural Ice Rinks.
Covered Outdoor Ice Rinks.
List of Unfenced Ice Rinks.

Editor's Blog by Jutta Mason

Toronto City Council, March 31, April 1 and 2

Item: Extending the outdoor skating season

Council adopted an item to direct the Parks, Forestry and Recreation division to include contingency funds in its 2016 operating budget to extend the outdoor skating season if weather permits.

In addition, staff are to evaluate the feasibility of pursuing multi-year sponsorship of the Toronto's artificial outdoor ice skating – that is, on outdoor rinks with mechanically chilled ice pads.

Awful decision. What part of "March sun" can city councillors not understand? The unamalgamated city had mid-November to first Sunday in March. That makes sense. The rinks this past March had a mere smattering of skaters (almost nobody wants to do winter stuff in March) and the ice was bad a lot of the time. A $250,000 waste of funds if you add up the tax money and the donut money. We have been trying to get that message to the councillors, city staff have numbers to prove it, and this media circus of staying open to the end of March break just keeps rolling along.

We need a good municipal comic who can show how ridiculous this stuff is and make everybody laugh. Where is that person?

 
March 14 2015: Let's save some money

In the middle of February, Mayor John Tory found out about a plan to spend $10,000 to add a dozen complicated electrical outlets for more public wi-fi in the Council Chamber. The Mayor was quoted in the media: "I would just say, no thank you, and that would be $10,000 on the way to finding efficiencies, which I said I was going to do over the course of the next year."

Here's an even more impressive efficiency: close all the outdoor rinks except for City Hall and Greenwood, on Sunday March 15. That will save $67,500 from the operating budget, on the other 15 city-funded rinks scheduled to stay open to the end of March break. (We're not counting the extra 12 rinks funded by Tim Horton's and MLSE).

Too bad about the $135,000 already spent to keep all those city-funded rinks open between March 1 and March 14, with mushy ice that was mostly unskateable, and very few skaters even wanting to try it. It's been painful to walk by a rink that has two skaters, with pylons set out and the sound of compressor motors whining at high speed from inside the rink plant, fighting the high March sun.

The City says it costs $4500 to keep one rink open for a week. That's $643 a day, for rinks that would make good ice at 12 degrees on a weak-sun November day, but get mushy and develop dangerous holes on a sunny day at -1 in March. The city has two popular rinks that have sun protection and can keep good ice in: City Hall, with all-afternoon shade from the 43-story Sheraton Hotel to the south, and Greenwood, whose hockey rink got a $3 million roof a few years ago. Mayor Tory, please ask your staff to put those two good rinks to use during March break and save the $67,500 by shutting down the remaining 15 city-funded rinks on Sunday evening, March 15. Maybe even close the 12 rinks that are still open because of your corporate donours. Their ice is just as bad. You could refund Tim Horton's and Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment's final $54,000 of their donation -- to show them that the City doesn't spend money foolishly, at least not for longer than two weeks.


the Sheraton Hotel is southwest of the rink at City Hall

Greenwood hockey rink, with a roof over it
 

Bad Ice Gallery


March 8, 2015: 6 celsius, Harry Gairey Rink

March 1, 2015: Dufferin Rink, minus 1, sunny day, hole in ice

Cedarvale Rink, March 10, 2015, 2 degrees, nobody there

March 12, 2015, 3 degrees: Ramsden Rink: some cement

Christie Rink March 12, 3 degrees: open but too bad to skate

Regent South, March 13, 3 degrees: by noon the rink is closed

Sir Adam Beck, March 19, 1 celsius, rink entry gate
 
February 21: 23 rinks are set to close too early, 29 are staying open too long

March sun is too strong for outdoor rinks

On Sunday February 22, 35 compressor-cooled rinks were scheduled to close for the season. In the coldest winter in decades, these rinks were supposed to close the earliest they have in years.

Mayor John Tory appealed to the private sector for donations to allow more of these rinks to stay open. Why? This rich city doesn't need a corporate handout. It needs common sense.

Here's the problem, easily solved. Too much of the city's allocated $6 million for the rink season was allocated to keep the other 17 rinks open until the end of March break -- March 22. They were set to stay open so late because city councillors are scared of the inevitable headlines if the rink schedules follow the rules of the sun instead of the school calendar. One year a Toronto paper ran a headline: "Pink Finks Sink Rinks." A left-leaning council had approved scheduling the end of the rink season at the beginning of March. Then came a few very cold days, with decent ice. The media were full of sympathy for the poor kids who wouldn't get to skate during March break. Two days later the sun came out and the rinks turned to mush. That was not newsworthy.

For many years, CityRinks has done studies and sent them around, showing that the original rink season, in place from the 1950s until amalgamation, makes the most sense. Rinks always opened mid-November and closed the first Sunday in March. That schedule was based on the smart understanding of the original rink builders. But it doesn't play well in a context of wishful thinking about the poor sad kids who want to skate during March break.

The interesting thing is, in those few years when March break came very early and the weather was unusually cold, the kids didn't come out during March break anyway. By March, most people, adults and kids, seem to have lost their taste for winter. Even with good ice, the rinks often have barely a handful of skaters. And with mushy ice, the rinks shut down for all but a few hours in the evenings, while the compressors struggle around the clock and fuel costs go way up.

Fixing the problem doesn't need another star-turn bailout. The best thing is to let all the compressor-cooled rinks open in mid-November, when skaters are excited about winter and the sun has very little strength. Then close all but a few of the most shade-protected rinks on the first Sunday in March, and get ready for spring. But this sensible schedule can only return if city councillors and the media can learn the elementary physics of the effect of sun on ice, so they can tell the truth to Torontonians.

But good sense will not return this year. On Friday Feb.20, the mayor announced that Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment (MLSE) and Green for Life will each donate $100,000 to raise the total of later-closing rinks to 29. A Feb.21 2015 Globe article points out that MLSE got a $10 million loan from the city to expand its BMO soccer field, and Green for Life is one of the city's private garbage contractors.

Really?

The article also says that city staff have logged much lower usage late in the season, no matter what the weather. The mayor says he understands this. So who is pushing for even more rinks to stay open into the high-sun mushy season?

 

February 2, 2015: This year was a great January for skating on Grenadier Pond

Jan.17: Grenadier Pond maintenance crew

Jan.23: ice is 12 inches thick

The almost snowless January, combined with steady cold made natural ice rinks a dream this year, all over the city. That includes Grenadier Pond in High Park, which had over a kilometre of 12-inch-thick, smooth, snow-less ice for most of the month. Nevertheless, the usual yellow “No Skating, No Access” signs ringed the pond, and on a few occasions a by-law officer tried (unsuccessfully, from the shore) to whistle skaters off. The City Parks By-law has a subsection on skating, which includes: 608-21 B: No person shall access or skate on a natural ice surface in a park where it is posted to prohibit it.

The same by-law also prohibits anyone being in a park between midnight and 5.30 a.m., tree climbing, snowball fights, weeding park gardens without a permit, or playing informal group sports without a permit. (Really?)

From Globe and Mail columnist Marcus Gee: "...for decades, even generations now, people have been coming to Grenadier Pond to skate, municipal codes be damned." Actually, until the mid-1990s people didn't have to damn the municipal code. Skating was not only allowed on Grenadier Pond, the city encouraged it and made it nicer. In the years when the ice was thick the city staff made a daily campfire and put straw bales around it so people could warm themselves. There were no rink guards -- who needs them on a pond? And the cost of having those two friendly campfire staff must have been less than the cost nowadays of putting up all those yellow signs and sending out by-law officers. The bylaw banning skating on the pond was not actually made until 2002, and part of the reason given then was saving the money it took to staff the campfire and clear a path on the ice. Before that, on those flukey winters when the ice froze before the snow came, the pond used to look like a Breughel painting, alive with skaters.

Last month, there were nine media items about skating on Grenadier Pond, including editorials in the Star and the Post. They all pointed out the same thing: skaters can be reminded that they skate at their own risk and they should be careful. The city can drill for ice thickness measurements and post that information without comment. Meantime, happy pond skaters practiced civil disobedience in January, before the snow.

January 2, 2015: Holiday Rink Math

Some of Toronto's 52 compressor-cooled outdoor rinks are bare-bones sports-facilities, but some are also important wintertime social spaces for their neighbourhoods.


very tidy changerooms, but not a social space

changeroom social space with snacks

Last month, as in many Decembers before, the rink information schedule on the city’s website indicated that most of the city’s 52 compressor-cooled rinks would keep their buildings locked on all three statutory holidays – Christmas Day, Boxing Day (yes, really) and New Year’s Day -- three of the holidays when neighbours like to greet one another, and perhaps catch up a little, at the rink. The ice surfaces would be unlocked for skating, but if people wanted to change their skates or have have a chat on a bench in a warm spot, or take their kids to the washroom, they would be out of luck.

Our cityrinks.ca website crew have been visiting these 50+ rinks for more than 10 years, and reporting on how they’re doing. We’ve been arguing with city management for almost as long about keeping the rinks open on those major holidays. And as the city website shows, now they do – but only the ice surface.

However, that’s not the whole story. This year we found that the change rooms and washrooms were open at all the rinks we visited in Etobicoke, on both Boxing Day and New Year’s Day, even though the city’s web schedule and 311 said they were closed. The busier of the Etobicoke rinks even had rink staff on site. On Boxing Day, a few of the downtown rink buildings we visited were open too, including the newly rebuilt Hodgson Rink and Greenwood Rink, both heavily used. But on New Year’s Day, those rinks were locked. Outside, parents were tying up kids’ skates with frozen fingers (it was a bitter wind). Skates, shoes, shin pads, helmets, snow pants were spread out all over the ground. And if somebody needed to go to the washroom…..


Greenwood Rink: building locked on New Year's Day

The reason for closing seems to be that staff are paid time-and-a-half on stat holidays. Closing the buildings saves that bonus money.

So here’s the math: Hodgson Rink has just been rebuilt for $2 million. Greenwood Rink was rebuilt last year for $3.4 million. The extra holiday bonus saved by not having a staff person to keep the rink buildings open on New Year’s Day is $77.00 for nine hours, per rink.

Canadians are famously polite, so they don’t tend to complain about much, other than the weather. But who doesn’t like transparency? Surely city management could put up posters at the locked rink buildings, clarifying the reason for saving the $77.00. If it’s to pay off the construction costs, it would be helpful to give a time frame – how long would it take before the $3.4 million Greenwood Rink cost would be paid off and holiday skaters could use the warm benches, have a chat with their neighbours, and go to the washroom again? Or if the closings are related to the city’s Parks and Recreation operating budget – maybe $400+ million a year isn’t quite enough – would it work if staff stood in front of the locked rink buildings with a bell, a Santa hat and a donation box? When $77.00 had been collected (surely not hard with all those people who want to skate with their families and friends on the main holidays), they could unlock the door. Problem solved.

Postscript: In Ward 18, all three rinks (Dufferin, Wallace, and Campbell), were open on all three holidays. On two of the holidays, so were Ramsden Rink (in Rosedale), and all the Etobicoke rinks. Transparency needed, again. Why the unequal treatment?

 

December 2, 1014. 311: tracking the trackers

Soon after David Miller was first elected as mayor in 2003, he took a trip to Baltimore. He came back with stars in his eyes, a convert to their 311 information system. 311 was the central number you could call in Baltimore to report a pothole or a slummy house or a broken park bench. 311 was backed by a system called “citistat” described as “an ‘executive information system’ like those used by corporations such as Frito-Lay or Mrs. Field’s Cookies.” The idea was to get as much data as possible and enter it into a system where it could be continuously analyzed by management. The system’s boosters described it like this: “Tracking citizens ‘ complaints, requests, tips, and comments can provide a wealth of information about service levels, employee interaction, and neighbourhood conditions and trends. Baltimore’s 311 telephone line provides a comprehensive system for gathering this kind of ‘soft’ data.” And the gathering of data would somehow lead to tremendous savings – officials in Baltimore say they have realized over $40 million in financial savings since they put in this system.

Wow! Mayor Miller came back and made sure that Toronto got one of those 311 systems as well. And since then, every few years there have been reports to the council committees about how well city staff feel the system is working and how much money they assume it's saving.

But we have to give it a big bad raspberry for ice rink information. Before 311, rink users could look in the phone book and call their local rink to ask about ice conditions. Then they could decide if they ought to get their skates and come down, or not bother until the ice was better. But in 2006 the order came to make individual rink telephone numbers unavailable to the public. Skaters were instructed to call one convenient number for rink information: 311.

CityRinks.ca has been tracking 311 for about five years. The 311 outdoor rink information is wrong more than 50% of the time calculated over a whole season; during storms that goes up to 90% wrong. No wonder. Toronto has more municipal outdoor compressor-cooled ice rinks than any city in the world – over 50. Every time the weather changes (sometimes three times a day), ice conditions may change. That’s way too many updates to be entered into a central reporting system.

At the Ward 18 rinks, phone numbers continue to be unofficially available. For Dufferin Rink: 416 392-0913. For Wallace Rink: 416 392-0911. For Campbell Rink: 416 392-6921 (but often out of order). A phone call is a simple, straightforward solution for a problem made complicated (and expensive) through 311. Sooner or later, other rinks will need to return to using the phone again too.

 
November 19, 2014: wishing for flexibility

Some rinks had their compressors turned on last Saturday (Nov.15). Then on Sunday night it snowed. Periods of snow mixed with rain continued all through the day on Monday, finally stopping in the evening. Presumably the compressors were turned on because that was a decision made some time ago -- to cool down the cement slab for those rinks that were set to open early. It would have been a good idea, if the weather had been as warm as in other years -- but in fact there had been four days of near-freezing temperatures before Saturday. The slabs would have cooled down on their own.

Still, there would have been no harm to running the compressors if not for the snow. But as it was, because the compressors were on before ice-making had begun, the snow became glued to the bare cement slab. It made a big mess. It seems that there is not enough flexibility in the city's rink management to react to weather at those rinks that had been turned on. Would it have been possible to turn off the compressors when the weather forecast warned of snow? Maybe not....


test patch, smooth ice but too thick to begin

On Monday evening the temperatures were just above freezing. Dufferin Rink had lumpy snow stuck all over it, but we decided to do a 6x20 foot test patch with the hot water hose to see if the snow would come off easily. It did. That left a lot of water which ought to be removed so that the slab would dry and ice-making could start properly (thin layers of ice laminated one over the other). Could a zamboni have helped to remove the water?

Who knows? There were no ice-making staff who came to the park on Monday evening. Nor is there communication between people who use the rink or run the programs, and ice maintenance staff. The ice makers are in a silo hermetically sealed from all rink users including the program staff.


a big mess, leaves and snow frozen into the ice

The next morning, as forecast by Environment Canada, temperatures plummeted to minus 9, winds gusted to 70 K an hour, and the ice-making staff, scheduled weeks before, began hosing the rink. They no longer found it easy to get the snow off the slab. The water they sprayed on froze everything into an even bigger mess.

Some day, maybe in five years, maybe in ten, some of the outdoor rinks may be run by locally-based crews instead of the current one-size-fits-all central management. In this blog, we'll continue to try to record what works and what doesn't. It will be our manual for that hoped-for day when experience and ingenuity will run the show.

Comment from program staff:

I don't think the Wallace compressor is on and the snow/rain that fell is frozen solid to the rink pads.

Response:

The snow and ice stayed on Wallace (even though there is no chance the compressors were on) because the temp went to minus 9 and didn't go up much in the daytime, and I'm guessing that no snow was removed beforehand when it was still warmer (on Monday).

Rinks where compressors were off and also snow was removed (on Monday, before the temperature went down):


Rennie Rink - hockey slab mostly concrete, some thin snow

High Park, snow removed and hosed down

Read More >>


Editor's Blog by Jutta Mason

2013-2014

March 10, 2014: Toronto is too rich

Toronto has many more outdoor compressor-cooled ice rinks than any other city in the world. That means we also spend much more to skate outdoors than other city in the world. According to Marcus Gee writing in the Globe, it costs us about $6 million a year to run those 52 outdoor rinks. When Mr.Gee did his daytime round trip of the rinks in February, he found many of them empty or with only a few skaters. There are more skaters in the evenings, and some rinks are well-programmed and therefore consistently busy. But even those well-used rinks have far fewer skaters in March than during the earlier months of winter.

Before the forced amalgamation in 1997, that jammed incompatible urban conglomerations all together into the new crazy quilt called Toronto, the outdoor rinks season more of less followed the rules of winter weather, including the angle of the sun. From the Toronto Archives, 1978: "With the exception of City Hall rink, which commences operation on the last Saturday of October and carries on until April, the artificial ice rinks are operated from November 15 until the first Sunday in March. Hours are 9 a.m. to 10.30 p.m. except 10 a.m. to 10.30 p.m. Sundays.”

Was there a yearly outcry when the rinks closed? The archive file doesn't show any. But over the last few decades it seems that Torontonians have lost their rink literacy -- they don't understand how compressor-cooled outdoor rinks work. The media and the elected representatives, even most skaters, make no fuss about delayed rink season openings or poor rink management, but when March arrives and there are some cold days, it's an easy moment for outrage. This year, once again, even with 17 outdoor rinks already scheduled to stay open, the "missing rinks" got their 15 minutes of fame.

If the additional 11 rinks only get 2700 visits altogether (a generous estimate) during those extra two and a half weeks of being open, that means a cost of $100 per skate. According to the instant rink experts among the politicians and the media, we should be able to cover that cost through our taxes from now on.

Well, why not? Toronto is rich, we don't have to be frugal, nor smart. If and when there's less money floating around, maybe we'll become smarter about the rinks.

February 28 2014

Go see for yourself how many people are skating at your newly re-opened neighbourhood outdoor rinks today. Two? Six? Canadian Tire and Scotiabank have covered themselves with glory by donating $270,000 to keep 11 additional rinks in ice until mid-March. The Globe's confused editorial this morning says that community groups should emulate Dufferin Rink by setting up public private partnerships with "local community groups." There is no such partnership at Dufferin Rink. And this website, cityrinks.ca, has gathered years of evidence -- from outdoor rinks across the city -- that the long-running pre-amalgamation practice of running the rinks from mid-November until the end of February works the best. Not only does that practice recognize the folly of fighting the March sun with expensive compressors, it also takes account of skaters' inclinations. Winter is exciting in November, tedious in March. Even on the rare good-ice days in a normal March, the rinks have a small fraction of the attendance, while the compressors turn into energy hogs on days when the sun comes out to lick away at the ice.

Councillor Paula Fletcher's idea of having some scheduling flexibility is nice. Maybe it can be tried. But back in December, when new-immigrant ESL school classes in her ward were locked out of the change rooms at Monarch Rink (policy: the change room stays locked on weekday mornings), the same councillor took no steps to change that. Today Monarch Rink has perfect, open, empty ice. The schools no longer come, because their phys ed schedule has moved on. Flexibility would certainly have been good, back in December.

February 26, 2014

Toronto has far more outdoor compressor-cooled ice rinks than any city in the world. 34 have closed for the season -- that still leaves 17 open right across the city, plus Harbourfront makes 18.

18 open and free outdoor compressor-cooled rinks are still more than any other city in the world. Plus there are lots of natural ice rinks. Our cityrinks list is just the tip of the iceberg.

Most of the 17 rinks still open were not showing a lot of skaters today, nor the rest of this week either. Did any reporters or politicians come skating, or even come to check out more than one rink for a 10 minute visit? The fact is that by this point, many skaters have lost their enthusiasm for winter. Even when the ice is good (which it won't be as soon as the temperature approaches zero on sunny days in March), the rinks get far less use than in the early, excited part of winter.

But the "outrage" of closing outdoor rinks keeps on making good copy for the media. Nine years ago, the Toronto Sun ran a headline when the rinks closed at the end of February: "Pink Finks Sink Rinks." That's because City Council was supposedly leftist and stingy. Now we have an article in the Toronto Sun in which a mayoral candidate deplores any closures. The Toronto Star is a bit more balanced but not much.

There are many ways the outdoor rinks could be made better (see the Feb.13 blog). Keeping all of them open into March -- when so few people come to skate -- is not one of those ways.

February 13, 2014

Access


Wheelchairs should not have to ask special permission.

A rink enthusiast wrote: "the helmet issue is all about access. The rink must be easily accessible to the community. Must must must."

Yes, access is the big issue. The city has posted rules. When the rules limit access, they should be changed.

Wheelchairs are allowed on the rink "if the supervisor agrees." But wheelchairs should be allowed on the rinks no matter what. The wheels can be easily cleaned of salt, which is one of the worries posted on the city's rules page. Staff can help make the experience a good one. Disabled children wearing their own therapeutic head protection should not switch that for a hockey helmet.


Strollers on the ice are an access issue for families.

Strollers can be treated the same way as wheelchairs. Forbidding strollers to come on the ice is restricting access for people with young children -- not okay. Staff can help wipe down the stroller wheels, and get on the ice along with the parents if help is needed. Infants should not be required to wear hockey helmets if strapped into a stroller -- a helmet can hurt an infant's neck and head. The stroller is the baby's protective frame.


Monarch Rink refused to allow morning access to ESL school classes.

Change rooms: Some of the city's rinks keep the change rooms and washrooms closed all morning or (in the case of the smaller "tennis-court" rinks) all day every day. That means schools and families have a hard time (and everybody else too). Who wants to sit in the cold snow to change their skates, or to look for a tree to hide behind when washrooms are locked up?

This situation has been improving gradually, with Etobicoke in the forefront -- unlocking change rooms for warmth and washroom access, even when there are no staff on site.

 

Doors: Some rinks in Etobicoke got in the habit of keeping their front doors locked, without even a sign directing people to the back doors. People "in the know" would go to the back door, but newcomers would be confused or just go home. At West Mall Rink (the main rink in Etobicoke!) the front doors are right by the bus stop, but they are usually locked. People have to walk a long way around to the back doors, near the car parking lot.

At Giovanni Caboto Rink, the front steps were kept unshovelled and front doors were kept locked, for years. This has now been fixed, so people can come inside from the front.


Caboto: steps used to be unshovelled, front doors locked

West Mall Rink: front rink door locked, no sign
 

Rink houses that are welcoming :

Many of the rink houses are cheerless and windowless, even scary. The message seems to be "hurry up and skate, then leave." Even change rooms that have windows and visibility toward the rinks are often depressing. Rink houses could, and should, be wintertime social spaces for their neighbourhoods.


windowless changeroom, only a washroom sign on the door

Regent Park South Changeroom, nothing to do.

 

Campbell Rink: the renovated office/snack bar

Some rink houses have been converted into social spaces. None of it costs very much. Sociable sitting areas provide access to neighbourhood people of all ages -- families meeting one another at the rink, youth hanging out, seniors who want to play cards -- whoever wants to be in a social space that includes skating but also more. A kitchen for snacks improve access for parents and caregivers and hungry shinny players, who don't have to interrupt their skating for longer than it takes to quickly refuel. Skate rentals provide access to newcomers who don't have their own skates, and also to families with growing children who can't afford to buy new skates every year.


Campbell Rink: donated kitchen sink

office turned into a kitchen and skate lending area
 

Helmet rules: Mandatory helmet rules are rare at outdoor rinks in Canada, but they are in force at outdoor rinks in Toronto. They interfere with access in two ways:

(1) the parents of small children are forced to buy hockey helmets in addition to helmets they may already have (like bike helmets). Parents who don't comply are ordered off the rinks.

(2) shinny hockey players who choose not to wear body armour for pond hockey (non-contact) are ordered off some of the outdoor rinks. At those rinks, drop-in attendance has shrunk. Access is limited mainly to hockey leagues, with here and there a few hours of drop-in pleasure-skating.

At many rinks, the refusal of shinny hockey players to wear body armour (including helmets) has carried the day despite the official rules. So their access to the rinks has been maintained, although unacknowledged by managers at City Hall.


can bike helmets protect little learners? Answer

Do helmets prevent concussions? Answer
 

General manager Jim Hart's response to our helmet questions: sounds a bit like go away!. Hopefully he doesn't really feel that way. Here's our first response. Read more about the helmet issue.

Wednesday Feb.5, 2014

Overnight and much of the day until late afternoon it snowed, amounting to about 15 cm. At 10.30 a.m. the city's outdoor rinks web page listed all the outdoor compressor-cooled rinks that are running this season (51) as CLOSED. Then at 12.30 the city's website listed all 21 downtown ("South District") outdoor rinks as "operational -- programs cancelled until further notice." Etobicoke, North York, and Scarborough rinks were all still listed as "closed." Hard to know what an operational rinks with no programs looks like. The "further notice" came at 7 pm, with the website suddenly listing almost all the south district rinks as simply "operational." An example: Regent South was declared "operational," but at 8 pm there was more than a foot of snow on it.

In reality, the downtown west rinks began to be cleared from about 3 pm on, and many of them were skateable by later afternoon. Not so for the same number of downtown east rinks. Basically the web page is unreliable as soon as there's a weather change involving snow or ice. Some rinks marked as closed will actually be open many hours sooner than the web site says; other rinks will be closed when they're marked as open. This problem could be solved immediately if rinks were allowed to have their own listed phones again, like swimming pools do. But so far, management has not budged on this -- like a stubborn kid.

Friday January 23, 2014: Orphan Rinks

Summerlea Rink, in Councillor Doug Ford's ward in Etobicoke, was closed from Dec.22, 2013, when the ice storm cause the area to be without power, until January 16 2014, a very long time after the power was restored. The rink was simply locked, no signs explaining why, or when it might be open again. According to the Councillor's assistant, during that whole three weeks, not ONE person called to complain or even to ask what was wrong with the rink.

Does anyone care about this rink, does it have any allies, or is it a kind of orphan?

On January 18, the Globe published a piece about the outdoor rinks by by Marcus Gee, about his morning travels to various rinks across Toronto. Many of the rinks were empty or had only one or two people skating. Some of the change rooms were locked. Some of the rinks were snow-covered or had trash blowing around them. But according to the Globe piece, it costs $6 million a year to operate these outdoor rinks. Are we getting value for money?

Thursday, Jan.9, 2014

Helmets have lost some of their luster in both the medical and the sports media. It turns out that they are of limited (or no) use in preventing concussions -- which is really their main purpose, as far as many skaters are concerned. The City of Toronto has hung on to its 9-year-old mandatory helmet policy, requiring all shinny hockey player to put on head armour. But noncompliance by shinny hockey players continues to rise citywide. The city’s inability to enforce its own policy should be a flag to rinks management. It's time to revisit the helmet rules, but with a different procedure than the last time. Instead of a staff decision made at a closed meeting at City Hall, the city should welcome wide-ranging rink-user input.

CELOS, the Centre for Local Research into Public Space (the sponsor of this website) has put out a "Special Helmets Issue" to collect the facts.

 
Sunday Dec.22, 2013

Dufferin Grove Park was coated with ice, as was every other place in the city: ice storm. In the morning the rink limped along with very few skaters and no road salt left to salt the walkways. By later afternoon people had kind of gotten desperate, or readjusted their "normal," because the rink house filled up and there were quite a few skate rentals. Many parts of the city were without heat or light, but this luckier neighbourhood never lost power.


trees beside the rink bent over with ice

8 pm: trees still iced up beside the shinny game
 
Dec.12 2013

The good news: there continues to be really good ice maintenance. The weather is helping -- quite cold and minimal snow. So it's too early for complacence. But the fact is, all over the city the ice is cleaned early in the day, the gates are left open for skaters, it works.

The not-so-good news: too many change rooms continue to have restricted access. Most of the east-end rinks still keep their change rooms locked in the mornings. Staff say it won't change. The results are predictable, as soon as it gets cold -- rinks, in perfect condition, have few or no skaters, and no school classes.

The better news: a change room unlocked for students. On Thursday morning when a big class of ESL students came to Monarch Rink with their teachers to skate, they found to their happy surprise that they wouldn't have to sit on the cold ground to change into their skaters -- the rink building was open. It turns out that the zamboni driver, when he heard that the students were coming, left the building unlocked for them. Just exactly what staff do in Etobicoke -- smart.

Dec.10 2013

The good news: good ice maintenance citywide. After the recent snowfall, the rinks were cleaned up really fast, apparently all over the city. And this year, there seem to be very few rinks that have a one-rink-only zamboni operator just sitting there in his or her office in between ice maintenance sessions. The drivers help out at multiple rinks. CELOS asked for this change over ten years ago, and finally gave up asking. Yet, here it is, a good economy and a good use of staff!

The not-so-good news: locked changerooms/ washrooms. Some of the rinks in the Toronto/East York region continue to keep their change rooms/washrooms locked all weekday mornings (in some places, on weekend mornings as well). This means that school classes have to change outside in the cold, and so do shift workers and all other morning skaters.

Students coming with their school classes are most affected. We've heard that Parks and Recreation and the school boards are in the grip of a standoff -- since schools charge Parks and Recreation to use school facilities for after-school programs, school classes are supposed to pay for permits for the outdoor rinks too.

The consequence of the standoff, if that's what this is, is empty rinks much of the morning. But the fuel to cool the rinks keeps being used anyway. A false economy! As well, the policy of locking the changerooms/washrooms all morning is utterly inconsistent across the city. At Dieppe Rink -- a newly rebuilt double rink -- the change room/washrooms are locked and unavailable not only on weekday mornings but even on Sunday mornings, when there are lots of skaters on the rink. Monarch Rink makes the ESL students from nearby schools stand around in the cold without washrooms when they come to skate (see the Dec.7 entry on the Rink Users' blog). And yet in Etobicoke, all the rink changerooms are open from 9 a.m., even those with only intermittent staffing. Smart! The city should apply this principle consistently everywhere else. The excuse of "security issues" or "kids will come in and smoke pot" should not be used to deprive everyone else of the warmth of the change rooms and the use of the washrooms. Happily,that same excuse has not yet been applied to keep unstaffed (i.e. all) park washrooms locked in the summertime.

Dec.6 2013

Yesterday, Dec.5, was a nice warm day -- temperatures went up to 12 in the mid-day, with periods of weak December sunshine. By 6 pm, all but one of the North Toronto outdoor rinks were listed as closed. Four Etobicoke rinks were shut down too, plus one closer to downtown (Cedarvale). Closing rinks when there is even a thin layer of water on top of the ice is a common practice in North Toronto. Beyond that, rinks with thinner ice are more unstable and vulnerable to warm temperatures early in the season. Since the ice-making at most of Toronto's municipal outdoor was so short before opening day (at many rinks, flooding began two and a half days before opening), there wasn't much in reserve. During the same time as all these rinks were closed, Harbourfront's Natrel Rink (not municipal), which had careful ice-making from the beginning, was filled with skaters. Dufferin Rink -- one of the few rinks that had a good standard of ice making at the outset -- was busy too, with excellent ice.

How long will this low standard carry on?

Dec.1, 2013

The good news: (1) the rain today helped add some thickness to the thin ice at so many city rinks, the day after opening day. (2) Here and there, a newly-opened rink was in good shape, with smooth ice of adequate thickness. The blue ribbon goes to Harry Gairey Rink at Bathurst and Dundas (the rink has two other names as well: Alexandra and Scadding). When we visited shortly before 10 a.m., the rink change rooms were locked but the ice was open and the first skaters looked like they were having a really good time. And the bulletin board which used to have four-year-old rink schedules on it, had been cleared of everything except a brass plaque telling the who Harry Gairey was -- a good story.

The less-good news:' The city's outdoor rink web page says they update it twice a day, but for opening weekend, the updates were only once a day, and even then they were questionable. I called 311 to find out if they had any newer information. They didn't, but the operator told me that rain "doesn't treat outdoor rinks well," so they might not be in good shape. I told her that actually the rain was helping to build the ice up, and she listened politely if doubtingly.

311 is a very odd concept, a favourite project of former Mayor David Miller. All of the city's public information was rerouted centrally. For instance, outdoor rinks used to publish their individual phone numbers so that people could just call up the rink they were interested in, and find out if it was in good shape. Now all the rink phone numbers are unlisted. All information is supposed to flow through 311. Those folks are supposed to have the answer for everything, or at least, to know who to ask. But they can't keep all those disparate little facts under control.

So they can sometimes come up with real bloopers. An example: on October 8, I e-mailed 311 to find out when the compressor-cooled outdoor rinks would be opening this year. The answer I got:

You are on the right path regarding finding the city outdoor rinks information. However, keep in mind that the city outdoor rinks are operational only if weather permitted. Unless the temperature dipped below zero, the ice is going to melt and become slushy. Thus, not safe for public skating.

Oh dear. My 311 respondent had maybe never heard of how else ice could be made. And neither, sadly, have at least some of her colleagues whose job is to answer all the rink questions of skaters, among thousands of other topics.

Saturday Nov.30 2013

This is the week when ice was being made on most of the remaining 38 of the city's outdoor rinks. Once again the Etobicoke rinks (and some rinks in other areas) did not even start their ice-making until Wednesday evening, two and a half days before the opening date. Some of the downtown rinks started earlier but then missed a day in the middle.

Rain early in the week froze to the cooling slabs, and that helped a bit, so today, the scheduled opening day, most rinks were able to get on the city website's "operational" list. Thin ice, patches of cement, pylons set out -- that's a very low standard of operating. How long can it go on?

Saturday, Nov.23, 2013

It looks like a strange wind is blowing in Etobicoke -- all the earlier-opening rinks started their ice-making too late and all of them are in trouble on opening day. So far, no apologies, though, only excuses -- "the weather was too warm"! At West Mall, the decision was taken to shut down the pleasure-skating side to conserve energy for making ice on the hockey side. It's not fossil fuel energy that's lacking, though, it's human energy. And accountability -- for the rink manager to say: "we made a mistake and we're going to fix it. Tonight, there will be a twelve hour overnight shift of two park staff patiently flooding at each rink that's a mess -- and not only flooding three times during the shift with naps in between. If it's still not fixed, we'll do another one tomorrow."

But that won't happen.

Year after year the same thing is evident -- the lack of will to make the rinks work properly. Meantime. there seems to be citywide enthusiasm by skaters to make "natural" rinks from scratch, just to get out from under the city's complicated, rule-bound approach.

Next fall, it's time to try an experiment. We'll call it Plan A: in November 2014 give the task of the Etobicoke ice start-up (hosing) to rink enthusiasts. Let skaters do the start-up floods, and cut their permit fees in exchange. If the rinks get opened on time, with good ice, it's a keeper.

The union will threaten mayhem -- well, let them arrange for an apprenticeship at Harbourfront and then pattern the ice start-ups on good practice. If they're unwilling, back to Plan A.

Wednesday Nov.21, 2013

At 2.30 on Wednesday afternoon I stopped by Rennie Rink, and found to my amazement that they had not begun to make ice. Three days before the scheduled opening, and bare cement on both rink slabs!

Two of us came back in the evening, at 8.30. The rink was plentifully flooded, areas of water with islands of ice. The two city staff said, "we put more than a thousand gallons of water on there since the start of our shift!"

Well, yes, we could see that. But to lay down good ice at the beginning, only a small amount of water should be put on each layer, creating a laminate of thin sheets of ice that will be a stable base throughout the season. These folks may not have known that. They didn't appear to know how compressors work, either, since they assured us that they could not have begun to make ice any sooner, since it had been sunny on Monday and Tuesday, and still a few degrees above freezing. We said, but what about Harbourfront? -- "They must have much stronger compressors." [They don't.] What about Greenwood, don't they have their ice in? -- "Their rink is covered." [Only half, and the skating trail under the open sky has just as much ice on it.] What about Dufferin Grove? -- their ice is in.

"No, it can't be. We know what we're doing. The weather still has to cool down some more." We asked if they would try to catch up by doing some overnight floods. No, their shift was over at 11 pm, that was the end for the day.

The formula for starting up outdoor ice, when a rink is cooled by compressors that push brine through the pipes, is simple: thin layers of water frequently applied during darkness (more than 12 hours a day at this time of year). The second part of the formula is doing whatever it takes to get the job done at the right time. That means counting backwards from opening day, adjusting to the weather, and giving yourself some leeway so that you don't depend on luck (cold and rain, maybe) for success.

None of those things seem within the secure grasp of the Parks Department.

RINK LITERACY

posted November 11, 2013

Toronto has more outdoor compressor-cooled rinks than any city in the world – 53. But our civic knowledge of the physics of ice maintenance hasn’t kept pace with our collective rink wealth. Many people seem to find it amazing, even shocking, that outdoor rinks can be skateable when the air temperature is above freezing, as high as 11 or even 15.

What’s the surprise? Collectively, as taxpayers, we spend about $500 a day at each rink to fuel the compressors that cool the rink pad. The rink compressors vary between 100 and 200 horsepower each – you can hear their noise through the compressor-room doors at the sides of the buildings. These compressors push a brine (salt water) solution through a big tank of cooling ammonia, and then out into the extensive grid of PVC pipes underneath the concrete floor of the rink. The cold liquid brings the entire big concrete slab to well below freezing, so any water that’s put on the surface of the rink pads sets up as ice right away. The brine liquid in the pipe grid circulates back into a large pipe in the “header trench” right next to the building, underneath where everybody stands when the zamboni is doing ice maintenance. From there the brine gets pushed back into the compressor room, where it passes through the freezing-cold ammonia tank, and out again into the pipes under the concrete, and so on.

The only serious match for this powerful cooling system is the sun, and in the months on either side of the December 21 winter solstice, the sun is very weak. It doesn’t get to spend very much time above the horizon, and that suits the compressors just fine.

The sun begins to gain real power toward the end of February, which is why, on a sunny day on, let’s say, February 25, when the air temperature is minus 8, the ice gets really mushy near the reflective boards, and even a bit soft in the middle. The compressors are losing ground as the sun prepares to bring on spring and summer. But on a low-sun Monday in November even at 11 degrees, a thin film of water forms on top of solid ice, and the shinny hockey and pleasure-skating are brilliant.

It’s not only rink users whose rink literacy is in some need of upgrading. The city’s rink staff are also confused. In our travels around the city's outdoor rinks, we have often heard zamboni drivers say that they can’t make ice because the temperature is above zero. The city’s Park management blames a multitude of ice-making sins on the temperature, global warming, etc. Convenient – but most of the time, not true. The compressor-cooled rinks can do their job, and having all those rinks can take some of the sting out of the dark months of winter for Torontontians.

The City of Toronto is always behind Harbourfront in getting the rinks open. Here's why:

The science is there, the history is there (pre-amalgamation), professionals say it can be done, Harbourfront is doing it, even volunteers have done it. Yet Toronto rink staff are a little rocky on the fundamentals of ice making.

Read More >>


2012-2013 Editor's blog


2013-2014 Rinks users' blog

Media 2014-2015

Keeping rinks open longer

Feb.28, 2015

"For city hall, $200,000 for rinks is a stretch." Globe column by Marcus Gee. Some excerpts:

The city’s 2015 budget is close to $10-billion. Spending by the parks, forestry and recreation department alone stands at $437-million...

The city government has a staggering list of responsibilities. It issues 45,000 building permits a year and conducts 165,000 building inspections. Its paramedics answered 274,220 medical calls last year, while the year before its cops made 41,255 arrests. It maintains more than 4,000 emergency-shelter beds in 58 locations.

City hall is spending $162-million for new subway cars and $600-million for new buses, not to mention $1.6-billion to upgrade the Ashbridges Bay sewage plant and $88-million to build new bike paths. Its state-of-good-repair backlog – what it needs to keep everything from falling apart – stood at $3.7-billion for 2014....Within a few years, city hall forecasts it will bump up against its debt ceiling, which keeps debt-servicing costs to under 15 per cent of its tax levy....

The plain fact is that the city must either a) do fewer things for its residents, or b) ask them to pay more for what they get. On past evidence, it will opt to do c) neither, and get Tim Hortons to pay for ice rinks instead.

Comment from CityRinks: There is a fourth option: do some better housekeeping of the outdoor rinks program.

(1) Open the rinks as soon as the sun is low and people are excited about winter (mid-November).

(2) Turn the rinks into more hospitable places, so that they’ll get maximum use during the skating season. That includes keeping the change rooms and washrooms open on all the stat holidays, and having more skate rentals. Staff can move the focus from rule-enforcement to fostering people’s enjoyment of skating, of the outdoors, and of wintertime neighbourhood sociability.

(2) Then close the rinks when the sun gets too high for good ice, fuel costs go through the roof, and attendance drops off anyway (early March).

Feb.26 2015

Globe editorial "Skating rinks are an essential service."

Feb.25 2015

Globe: "Toronto moves toward making more outdoor rinks available." Excerpts:

Toronto’s parks committee has moved to address recent criticism over the city’s ice skating policies, approving two motions that aim to make more outdoor rinks available, and for longer.

On Wednesday, the committee approved a motion to create a contingency fund that would allow the city to extend its outdoor rink season in years when the weather is cold enough to do so. The committee also approved a motion that asks city staff to report back on the viability of allowing skating on Grenadier Pond in High Park.

Feb.24, 2015

Globe: "Last-minute donation needed to extend Toronto's skating season." Excerpts:

Waste management company Green For Life, which last Friday pledged $100,000 to keep additional rinks open through the March break, withdrew the offer after city staff flagged problems over the weekend. Tim Hortons stepped in Tuesday with a replacement donation, matching a $100,000 gift from Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment. The corporate funds will allow an additional 12 rinks to stay open for an extended season, taking the total in the city to 29. All others are now closed....

...Councillor Gord Perks said the rules on donations and sponsorship are clear and the switch could have been avoided if the sponsorship deal had been vetted by city staff before they were announced.

“In between the announcement and today, someone in the public service checked the rules and found that there was a problem with GFL,” he said. “I think it’s a great thing that members for the community want to step up and help out, but we have to make sure that we are absolutely spotless when we take that money.”

MLSE also has extensive dealings with the city, including a $10-million loan it received from the city last year for the expansion of BMO field.

Asked whether city policies were followed in securing the donations, Mr. Tory said the corporate donors approached the city and details were worked out by city staff. He agreed measures need to be taken to avoid such last-minute fixes in the future.

“I think we have to take a serious look at how many rinks we can keep open with city funds – knowing that they are not unlimited – through the school-break week,“ he said.

Feb.22, 2015:

The Star: editorial "Toronto should find money to keep its outdoor ice rinks open."

Feb.20, 2015

The Star: "Corporate donors keeping 12 rinks open"


Grenadier Pond

February 18, 2015

The Star -- Councillor Sarah Doucette will ask staff for a report

January 25, 2015

The Star - a story about writer Richard Sanger's yearly adventures on Grenadier Pond

January 26, 2015

CBC story and poll about skating on the pond.

January 27, 2015

680 news story

Torontoist story

January 29, 2015

National Post editorial about skating on Grenadier Pond

"Get out there and skate" by Peter Kuitenbrouwer.

Star editorial about skating and tobogganing

Read More >>

Rules for a community rink

What is shinny hockey? A little film clip from Campbell Rink.

Our rinks are community rinks. All members of the community are welcome to skate, play hockey, or meet their friends here. Rink staff would be pleased to answer any questions you may have about the programs and policies.

Please observe the following rules so that everyone can enjoy the rink:

  • Respect programs and permit times in designated areas.
  • Do not use hockey sticks or pucks on the pleasure skating side.
  • Leave the ice surface or any other rink area when asked to do so by staff.
  • Put garbage in cans, not on the floor.
  • Do not smoke in the rink house or on the ice.
  • Be considerate of noise levels.
  • Do not use foul, offensive or racist language.
  • Do not fight or play roughly inside the building or on the rink surface.
  • Do not damage anything.

In case of a serious disagreement between rink staff and a rink user about any of these rules, the staff may ask the rink user to leave the rink until the matter is discussed with the Recreation Supervisor. If the rink user refuses the staff’s request to leave the rink, a letter of trespass may result.

Ice Allocation Policy and Permits

posted November 12, 2013

City of Toronto website links

 

Helmets

Helmets have lost some of their luster in both the medical and the sports media. It turns out that they have some important limitations in preventing concussions -- which is really their main purpose, as far as many skaters are concerned. The City of Toronto has hung on to its 9-year-old mandatory helmet policy, requiring all shinny hockey player to put on head armour. Little kids under 6 are also required to wear ONLY CSA-certified hockey helmets -- for pleasure-skating. Hockey helmets are designed to absorb impacts from pucks, sticks, and body-checking.

CELOS, the Centre for Local Research into Public Space (the sponsor of this website) has ollected quite a bit of material on all sides of the helmet question.

Cityrinks.ca Opinion

A Rink Safety Story

The approach of mandating hockey helmets for little kids effectively blocks families from using the rinks if they don't want to buy another set of helmets in addition to the bike (or trike!) helmets most kids already have.

Read this rink user's story

The Data

Noncompliance by shinny hockey players continues to rise citywide. The city’s inability to enforce its own policy should be a flag to rinks management.

Data collected by Rule-Makers

Data collected by CELOS

Helmet Rules Across Canada

PFR Management

It's time to revisit the helmet rules, but with a different procedure than the last time. Instead of a staff decision made at a closed meeting at City Hall, the city should welcome wide-ranging rink-user input. Read our latest letter from Kelvin Seow, City Manager for PFR, and the latest letters to and from Jim Hart, General Manager for the PFR, City of Toronto.

Click on correspondence for everything we've received from city management through the years.

Problems with the City's Helmet Policy

...continued

City Rinks Special Edition on Helmets

Read the Special Helmets Issue and its References as published January 9th, 2014

Links

"Restore CSA"

A Calgary group called RestoreCSA and their claim that the CSA’s monopoly on hockey helmet certification in Canada "appears to be in violation of multiple sections of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)"

On November 28th, the Federal Industry Minister, James Moore, made a declaration to Parliament that materials developed by the CSA and incorporated into provincial laws are merely "voluntary standards" whose character as independent of the law is unchanged by inclusion within the law. As noted previously, this action invalidates as a legal requirement all inclusions within law as furnished by CSA or other commercial entities." 178 specific CSA standards included within a wide variety of Federal laws.

Z262.1 is the identifier for the CSA standard for Ice Hockey Helmets.

Additional Web links

 
BASIC RINK LITERACY

Toronto has more outdoor compressor-cooled rinks than any city in the world – 52. But our civic knowledge of the physics of ice maintenance hasn’t kept pace with our collective rink wealth. Many people seem to find it amazing, even shocking, that outdoor rinks can be skateable when the air temperature is above freezing, as high as 11 or even 15 - during the low-sun months.

What’s the surprise? Collectively, as taxpayers, we spend about $500 a day at each rink to fuel the compressors that cool the rink pad. The rink compressors vary between 100 and 200 horsepower each – you can hear their noise through the compressor-room doors at the sides of the buildings. These compressors push a brine (salt water) solution through a big tank of cooling ammonia, and then out into the extensive grid of PVC pipes underneath the concrete floor of the rink. The cold liquid brings the entire big concrete slab to well below freezing, so any water that’s put on the surface of the rink pads sets up as ice right away. The brine liquid in the pipe grid circulates back into a large pipe in the “header trench” right next to the building, underneath where everybody stands when the zamboni is doing ice maintenance. From there the brine gets pushed back into the compressor room, where it passes through the freezing-cold ammonia tank, and out again into the pipes under the concrete, and so on.

The only serious match for this powerful cooling system is the sun. In the months on either side of the December 21 winter solstice, the sun is very weak. It doesn’t get to spend very much time above the horizon, and that suits the compressors just fine. By March, though, the sun is getting much higher in the sky, and the compressors labour to keep the ice frozen at minus 4.

Even on a sunny day at the end of February, when the air temperature is minus 8, the ice gets really mushy near the reflective boards, and a bit soft in the middle. The compressors are losing ground as the sun prepares to bring on spring and summer. But on a low-sun Monday in November at 11 degrees, a thin film of water forms on top of solid ice, and the shinny hockey and pleasure-skating are brilliant.

It’s not only rink users whose rink literacy is in some need of upgrading. The city’s rink staff are also confused. In our travels around the city's outdoor rinks, we have heard some zamboni drivers say in low-sun November that they can’t make ice because the temperature is above zero. Over the years, the city’s Parks management has blamed a multitude of ice-making sins on the temperature, global warming, etc. Convenient - but most of the time, not true. The compressor-cooled rinks can do their job, and having all those rinks can take some of the sting out of the dark months of winter for Torontonians. But if the zamboni staff tell you that their zamboni sinks into the mush in early March, you'd better believe them -- or just take a look yourself.


TORONTO'S OUTDOOR RINKS AS WINTERTIME NEIGHBOURHOOD SOCIAL SPACES

Many of Toronto's 52 compressor-cooled municipal outdoor rinks are bare-bones sports facilities, but some are also important wintertime social spaces for their neighbourhoods. People expect to meet acquaintances there, to chat and catch up on news as well as skating together. Double-pad rinks are more likely to have this function, since pleasure-skating is anytime there, not only in restricted time slots. A few single-pad rinks have also become social spaces, either because of a particular location in a neighbourhood or because of programs (such as a weekly community supper) that maximize the friendship possibilities of the rink.

Double-pad rinks that are also neighbourhood social spaces (to widely varying degrees): Rennie, High Park, Dufferin, Wallace, Harry Gairey, Otter Creek, North Toronto Memorial, Hodgson, Ramsden, Dieppe, Greenwood.

Single-pad rinks that are also social spaces: Buttonwood, Colonel Sam Smith Skating Trail, Valleyfield, Wedgewood, Ledbury, Campbell, Cedarvale, Christie Pits, Kew Gardens, Withrow.

Harbourfront's Natrel Rink (not municipal) is both an entertainment venue and a social space where friends often arrange to meet.

The wintertime social meeting-up function of rinks needs to be better recognized, and fostered, than it is at present.


The City of Toronto is always behind Harbourfront in getting the rinks open. Here's why:

The science is there, the history is there (pre-amalgamation), professionals say it can be done, Harbourfront is doing it, even volunteers have done it. This list supplies the fundamentals of ice making.

Questions or Comments?

Contact cityrinks.ca at mail@cityrinks.ca to :
  • Ask General questions:
  • Share Rink stories or pictures
  • Report Problems at any of the rinks
  • Contact the editor
  • Discuss Technical website issues
  • Find detailed rink information including schedules at City Rink Details
Contact the City of Toronto
  • For individual rink schedules: dial 3-1-1
  • The City's rink hotline 416-338-RINK (7465) is no longer in service
  • A few rinks have a direct line. Go to the individual rink profile through the Quick Links.
  • For permit phone numbers see "Contacts to get Permits" in the Rules & Permits tab
  • City website for Skating & Rinks

Pond hockey as it's always been played: no helmets, no body armour, no checking, no slapshots - just the joy of the game


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